Last edited by Faezahn
Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

4 edition of The face of Jizō found in the catalog.

The face of Jizō

Hank Glassman

The face of Jizō

image and cult in medieval Japanese Buddhism

by Hank Glassman

  • 214 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published by University of Hawaiʻi Press in Honolulu .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Cult,
  • Buddhism,
  • Idols and images,
  • Buddhist art and symbolism,
  • Kṣitigarbha (Buddhist deity),
  • Worship,
  • History

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementHank Glassman
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBQ4710.K74 J336 2012
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25018683M
    ISBN 109780824834432, 9780824835811
    LC Control Number2011034561

      Scholar Hank Glassman devotes two chapters to this topic is his wonderful new book “The Face of Jizo” — a must read!!!!! You will find many answers — or extremely plausible “pointers” — regarding Jizo’s association with rocks and boundary stones. See below link. I heartily recommend this book.   From lavishly colored paintings and sculptures to simple stones, beloved images of Jizō are brought to life in the pages of this book.” —Sherry Fowler, University of Kansas. January / ISBN / $ (PAPER).

    Jizō is everywhere in Japan: the edge of town, the street corner, the playground, next to the rice field. He is the most commonly depicted deity, his images outnumbering even those of Kannon. The observant visitor to modern Japan will immediately notice the abundance of small stone images at : Sarah J. Horton. Review of Hank Glassman, The Face of Jizō: Image and Cult in Medieval Japanese Buddhism, for Impressions: The Journal of the Japanese Art Society, vol. 34 (). Review of Sherry D. Fowler, Murōji: Rearranging Art and History at a Japanese Buddhist Temple, H-Buddhism, H-Net Reviews, May,

    His lower half was taken care of by his tail. "Hari Jizō was a success," he said as his hair returned to normal. "It doesn't matter," said the Inakamono's. "You won't be able to figure out where I am and I can just make more balloons. Face it, you can't win." Naruto smirked and bit his thumb.   "A nonchalant string of anecdotes and wisecracks, told by a fellow who doesn't have a name, and has never caught a mouse, and isn't much good for anything except watching human beings in action " —The New Yorker Written over the course of , Soseki Natsume's comic masterpiece, I Am a Cat, satirizes the foolishness of upper-middle-class Japanese society during the 2/5(2).


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The face of Jizō by Hank Glassman Download PDF EPUB FB2

Although the study of Jizo is often relegated to the folkloric, Hank Glassman, in this highly original and readable book, demonstrates that the bodhisattva's cult was promoted and embraced at the most elite levels of society. The Face of Jizo explores the stories behind sculptural and painted images of Jizo to reveal a fascinating cultural history.

Hank Glassman's detailed and probing investigation into the context and changing purpose of Jizō iconology in The Face of Jizō () represents an intriguing and informative case study of one image's transformative role in the history of Japanese by: 5.

Hank Glassman's detailed and probing investigation into the context and changing purpose of Jizō iconology in The Face of Jizō () represents an intriguing and informative case study of one image's transformative role in the history of Japanese Buddhism/5(16).

The Face of Jizō: Image and Cult in Medieval Japanese Buddhism, by Hank Glassman, is a delight to fills a large gap in existing studies in English of the bodhisattva Jizō. Until now, the only academic monograph in English to focus on Jizō in his Japanese guise has been William LaFleur’s Liquid Life: Abortion and Buddhism (Princeton University Press, ), which deals with the.

The Face of Jizo explores the stories behind sculptural and painted images of Jizo to reveal a fascinating cultural history.

Employing the methodologies of the early twentieth-century renegade art historian Aby Warburg, Glassman’s focus on the visual culture of medieval Japanese religion is not concerned with the surface form or.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

The Face of Jizo: Image and Cult in Medieval Japanese Buddhism | Hank Glassman | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon/5(14). Happily, The Face of Jizō is exceptionally well illustrated, with eighteen color plates and sixty-four black-and-white figures.

These images, which are fascinating in their own right, anchor Glassman’s analysis and provide a rich visual dimension to the book. The Face of Jizō: Image and Cult in Medieval Japanese Buddhism by Hank Glassman (review) The Face of Jizō: Image and Cult in Medieval Japanese Buddhism by Hank Glassman (review) Horton, Sarah J.

Are tengu terrifying, as their association with the term "evil" implies. Not really. Kṣitigarbha's face and head are also idealised, featuring the third eye, elongated ears and the other standard attributes of a buddha. Iconography in Japan [ edit ] Jizō bodhisattva statue at Mibu-dera temple, depicted with children and e: 地藏菩薩 地藏菩萨, (Pinyin: Dìzàng Púsà).

Buy The Face of Jizo: Image and Cult in Medieval Japanese Buddhism by Hank Glassman () by (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders/5(14). A guide to Jizo, guardian of travelers and the weak by Amy Chavez. Article history. Online: ; all revealed in Glassman’s book, “Face of Jizo.” If you’d like to.

This book is a cultural history on the role of icons in the development and dissemination of the worship of a Buddhist deity in Japan from the thirteenth century to the seventeenth. --author-supplied description The Face of Jizō: Image and Cult in Medieval Japanese Buddhism.

Honolulu: University of Hawaiʻi, Print. DOWNLOADS. Since Cited by: 5. Hebden Bridge Zen Group 13 April at Gelong Thubten shares practical ideas from his best-selling book 'The Monk's Guide to Happiness' - to help us master our minds, develop compassion and find l. Hats for Six Jizō, Popular Children’s Book Kasa Jizō 笠地蔵 (Hatted Jizō or Jizō with Hat), also known as Hibō Jizō 被帽地蔵) is an extremely popular fairy tale attributed to both Iwate and Fukushima prefectures.

The gentle, round face of Jizō, the guardian deity of. Yama in Theravāda Buddhism. In the Pali canon, the Buddha states that a person who has ill-treated their parents, ascetics, holy persons, or elders is taken upon his death to Yama. Yama then asks the ignoble person if he ever considered his own ill conduct in light of birth, deterioration, sickness, worldly retribution and death ().In response to Yama's questions, such an ignoble person.

Universal Fellowship of Light. likes. The Universal Fellowship of Light promotes the enlightenment of humanity. The Universal Fellowship of Light proclaims that “We are One in Love and Light.”. "The Face of Jizō: Image and Cult in Medieval Japanese Buddhism.

By Hank Glassman. Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press, xii + pages. ISBN (cloth) 0 2; ISBN (paper) 0 1." published on 01 Jan by : Edward Drott.

Compelled to seek something more than what modern society has to offer, Robert Sibley turned to an ancient setting for help in recovering what has been lost. The Henro Michi is one of the oldest and most famous pilgrimage routes in Japan.

It consists of a circuit of eighty-eight temples around the perimeter of Shikoku, the smallest of Japan's four main islands.

Rie Miyazawa (宮沢 りえ, Miyazawa Rie, born April 6, ) is a Japanese actress and former fashion model and singer.

She has done glamour modeling too, having released four photobooks. She is also well known as former fiancé of sumo wrestler Takanohana, to whom she was engaged for 2 months, and for her years of fighting anorexia nervosa.

practices focused on statues of Jizō. Fujiwara suggests that worshippers’ dependence on Jizō, materialized in the practice of vows and the circulation of the statue’s many heads, produces a Author: Kuniko Fujiwara.This book is two hundred years old.

It is called Sai-no-Kawara-kuchi-zu-sami-no-den, which is, literally, The Legend of the Humming of the Sai-no-Kawara. And this is the wasan.” And he reads me the hymn of Jizo -- the legend of the murmur of the little ghosts, the legend of the humming of the Sai-no-Kawara, rhythmically, like a song.He has written on sacred images, popular literature, and funerary practices.

His first book, The Face of Jizō was published in ; he is currently engaged in research on the grave marker called the gorintō.